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Opens in a new window Medline Abstract (ID 12624548)
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Vol. 55, No. 1, 2003 

Free Abstract     Article (References)     Article (PDF 107 KB)     

Original Paper

Long-Term Administration of Intravaginal Dehydroepiandrosterone on Regression of Low-Grade Cervical Dysplasia - A Pilot Study
Elizabeth Suh-Burgmann, Julia Sivret, Linda R. Duska, Marcella Del Carmen, Michael V. Seiden

Divisions of Gynecologic Oncology and Hematology Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston,Mass.,USA

Address of Corresponding Author

Gynecologic and Obstetric Investigation 2003;55:25-31 (DOI: 10.1159/000068953)


 goto top of page Key Words

  • Chemoprevention
  • Dehydroepiandrosterone
  • Neoplasia
  • Preinvasive cervical disease
  • Cervix
  • Dysplasia

 goto top of page Abstract

Although many dysplastic cervical lesions regress spontaneously, treatment is common due to concern for progression. Lesions persist or progress in women whose immune systems are unable to clear infection by human papillomavirus (HPV). Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) is an adrenal steroid that has both immune modulatory and tumor inhibitory activity. A pilot study was conducted to examine the feasibility, safety and potential efficacy of intravaginal DHEA in women with low-grade cervical dysplasia. Twelve women with low-grade dysplasia, confirmed by colposcopic exam, were given 150 mg of intravaginal micronized DHEA daily for up to 6 months. Follow-up evaluations of the cervix were done at 3 and 6 months of use. DHEA, DHEA-S, androstenedione and testosterone levels were also measured. By the end of the study period, 10 of the 12 women (83%) had no evidence of dysplasia; the remaining 2 had normal colposcopic exams but cytology showing atypical cells of undetermined significance. There were no serious side effects. Androstenedione levels were elevated at 3 months, whereas testosterone levels were unchanged over the course of treatment. The results suggest that intravaginal DHEA is safe and well tolerated and may promote regression of low-grade cervical lesions. Further study is needed to establish efficacy.

Copyright 2003 S. Karger AG, Basel


 goto top of page Author Contacts

Elizabeth Suh-Burgmann, MD
Kaiser Permanente Medical Center, Division of Gynecologic Oncology
2238 Geary, 5th Floor
San Francisco, CA 94115 (USA)
Tel. +1 415 833 0389, Fax +1 415 833 4301, E-Mail Betty.Suh-Burgmann@kp.org


 goto top of page Article Information

Received: June 10, 2002
Accepted after revision: November 25, 2002
Number of Print Pages : 7
Number of Figures : 1, Number of Tables : 1, Number of References : 35


Free Abstract     Article (References)     Article (PDF 107 KB)     


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copyright   2005 S. Karger AG, Basel